Julius Caesar’s Cell Block Tango

Date: 2009
Posted by: KiteShiro
Cast: Marlon Brando (Mark Antony), James Mason (Brutus), John Gielgud (Cassius), Louis Calhern (Julius Caesar) etc.
Credits: Music composed by John Kander, lyrics written by Fred Ebb
Duration: 7.22

Well, you can look at the phenomenon of YouTube Shakespeare and get all critically serious, coming up (you hope) with some telling observations which will advance the state of human knowledge, or you can just have fun. And this is great fun. It’s a fanvid, or the product of vidding (Wikipedia: “the fan labor practice in media fandom of creating music videos from the footage of one or more visual media sources, thereby exploring the source itself in a new way”). In this case someone has taken the 1953 MGM film Julius Caesar, and cross-fertilised it with ‘Cell Block Tango’ from the musical Chicago. Though the video quality is not that great, the re-cutting on the film to the music is spot on. What does is matter if the spoken sections don’t even remotely synchronise with the mouths? It’s funny. It makes you smile because you know the film, the musical and the play, and they come together beautifully. This is what 400 years of popular culture can do for us. And, let’s face it, Shakespeare would be kicking himself for not having come up with these words first.

He had it coming
He had it coming
He only had himself to blame

If you’d have been there
If you’d have heard it
I betcha you would
Have done the same!

Ending with the MGM logo is a nice touch too.

Links: YouTube page
Lyrics to ‘Cell Block Tango’ at Metrolyrics.com

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Bright Summer Night

Date: 2016
Posted by: The Candle Wasters
Cast: Meesha Rikk (Puck Goodall), Kalisha Wasasala (Lena Balavu), Dani Yourukova (Deme George), Maddie Adams (Mia Selene), Shane Murphy (Zander Makau), Thomasin McKenzie (Petra Quince), Gala Baumfield (Nicky Xing), Nova Moala-Knox (Frankie Piper), Brendan King (Taylor Sutton), Jack Buchanan (Bryn Alberich), Neenah Dekkers-Reihana (Awhina Parekura), Mouce Young (Poppy Hóu), Freya Milner (Thea Quince)
Credits: Main credits: Elsie Bollinger (director, editor, script writer, music supervisor), Sally Bollinger (script writer, post production supervisor), Bevin Linkhorn (producer), Minnie Grace (producer), Jess Charlton (Director of Photography), Jen Smith (1st Assistant Director), Nicole Winer (1st Assistant Camera), Jordan Beresford (1st Assistant Camera), Jordan Beresford, Blair Berg, Ross Dredge, Alex Marie, Alexandra Farley, Anne van der Pasch, Michael Young, Mark Papalii, Andy MacRae (all 2nd Assistant Camera), Jessi Golding (Sound Recordist), Claris Jacobs (Production & Costume Designer), Nic Learmonth (Art Director), Robbie Nicol (Script Supervisor)
Duration: 10 episodes

The third Shakespeare web series by the New Zealand production team The Candle Wasters is its most polished and courageous work yet. The company’s first two series adapted Much Ado About Nothing (Nothing Much To Do) and Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lovely Little Losers), the second serving as a sequel to the first, with much of the same cast. Bright Summer Night, an adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, shows some significant changes: a glossier production, a move away from the vlogging style in which characters spoke confidentially to the camera to a more usual dramatic style, a shorter number of episodes (a trim ten), and a new cast. The tone is also darker, the style more assured, the production credits that much longer. What was charmingly amateur has become ever more meticulously professional.

Shakespeare has once again be translated to the world and language of the young in modern day New Zealand, though such is the actors’ mixture of names and cultural heritages that it could be – and is meant to be – any place. The action takes place over the few hours of an all-night house party. All episodes bar the last are named after one of the characters and broadly shows the story from their point of view. The parallels with Shakespeare are amusingly made without being too forced: from the names of the characters (Hermia becomes Mia, Nick Bottom become Nicky, and so on), to the fancy dress theme which allows some of the players to wear fairy wings, to the rude mechanical becoming The Mechanicals, a band who put on a song for the rest of the party in the series finale. The four young lovers are now a heterosexual pair and a homosexual pair, Bryn (Oberon) and Awhina (Titania) a bickering senior couple, and Puck an ambiguous figure, whose personal uncertainty emerges as the series’ underlying motif.

The most striking is the use of recreational drugs to stand in for magic, a pill named Idleness being the cause of the lovers’ confusion, distributed by Puck. It is a practical dramatic solution, but a little shocking to see it applied so frankly.

360-degree promo video for Bright Summer Night, following Puck through the house party

The tone of the piece is far from the traditional light view of the play (such as the BBC’s recent production, produced by Russell Davies, kept to, for all its surface radical invention). No one is happy. The students are torn apart internally by the complexity of relationships, and externally by the problems of the world, especially climate change. Both are summed up in the Mechanicals’ song ‘Relationship Problems and the Environment’, which says “There’s so much wrong with the world, we’ll never make it better” but also declares that “We have to do something”. That becomes the message of the series, that, as difficult as things are, you move on, because you have to do so. The only character that cannot move on, it turns out, is Puck, and Bright Summer Night makes its strongest mark on Shakespeare’s play by turning it into Puck’s tragedy, as the memorable tenth episode makes clear.

Bright Summer Night benefited from a Kickstarter campaign, then gained support from NZ on Air and the British Council. it is a slick, confident production, impressively shot (all of it at night) and performed throughout, with particularly good integration of music into the scenes. It lacks the happy charm and ramshackle invention of its predecessors, and like some of its subjects perhaps takes things too seriously with insufficient reason for doing so. But overall this is inventive, thought-provoking and multi-layered filmmaking. Shakespeare, in his quatercentenary year, is proven to be as relevant and adaptable as ever.

Series of behind the scenes videos, with the points of view of the different groups of characters

Links:
YouTube series page
Behind the scenes series
Bright Summer Night section on The Candle Wasters’ site
Kickstarter page

Prospero’s Dream

Date: 2010
Posted by: petrarchian
Cast: None
Credits: Not given
Duration: 2.51

Online videos that show a truly imaginative response to Shakespeare, rather than simply reflecting that which was already there, are rare. Here’s one. The filmmaker (presumably petrachian) has produced an interpretation of Prospero’s speech “Our revels now are ended” without using a single word of that speech. Instead it offers a hypnotic interweaving of images (dripping water, ice floes, text, film clips, fading in and out of one another), music and muffled speech. The video is specifically a tribute to Peter Greenaway, as the filmmaker notes on the YouTube page. Greenway’s films include the idiosyncratic feature film interpretation of The Tempest, Prospero’s Books (1991), in which, as petrachian puts it, Greenaway “layers all artistic modes into an expression that denies simple narrative”. The video imitates Greenaway’s style (particularly his fascination with the look of electronic video) and the film clips referenced are from Greenaway films, though so buried in the visual mix that it is not easy to distinguish them.

The result feels like the kind of dream we would expect Prospero to have, both Shakespeare’s creation, and the dream of Greenaway’s Prospero: the homage and the thing itself. The filmmaker calls this video response “simply a dream narrative, a wrestless [sic] subconscious, a churning of impressions which mean nothing at all”. There is meaning, though, in showing through mysterious video imagery and sound how the insubstantial pageant of the drama has faded, and with it certainty and belief. A small work of art, impeccably formed.

Links: YouTube page

Macbeth

Date: 2012
Posted by: TheGeekyBlonde
Cast: Rhiannon McGavin (narrator, Sockspeare, First Witch, Second Witch, Third Witch, Duncan, Captain, Ross, Macbeth, Banquo, Malcolm, Lady Macbeth, Messenger, Fleance, the Porter, Macduff, Donalbain, First Murderer, Second Murderer, Third Murderer, Lennox, Hecate, Gentlewoman, The Doctor, Siward, Seyton, Young Siward)
Credits: Not given
Duration: 14.03

Among the vast number of Shakespearean videos that now exist, so many of them doing the same thing and seldom very well, it is difficult to stand out – and still more difficult to establish a distinctive style. One filmmaker who has achieved this is Los Angeles-based Rhiannon McGavin, aka The Geeky Blonde. McGavin produces videos on subjects as diverse as poetry and skincare, and her playlist Condensed Shakespeare presents summaries of the plays in an inventive style all of her own.

McGavin’s videos give us the essential plot lines, with occasional snippets of Shakespeare’s own words. She is the sole performer, cutting between herself as one character and the next (entailing many bargain-basement costume changes, mostly hats), at the same time cutting between the matter in hand and her wry 21st-century perspective on the plays’ surface absurdities. The videos simultaneously mock and honour their subject. As each character is introduced there is a comic character description written alongside their name at the foot of the screen. These are videos with their own graphical as well as visual style.

The example here, Macbeth, is typical of the filmmaker’s invention. The story is presented as a Hallowe’en treat, with McGavin narrating the story (dressed as the ghost of herself) at the encouragement of her sidekick sock puppet Sockspeare. She then plays twenty-five characters from the play, rapidly cutting from one to the next, all shot in her house and garden in a style that looks charmingly home-made yet clearly involved meticulous preparation and not a little videomaking skill – a model exercise in how to produce Shakespeare out of next to nothing.

McGavin has made similar videos for The Merchant of Venice, Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, Hamlet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, The Comedy of Errors and Titus Andronicus, between 2011-2013. She does not repeat herself; while keeping to her distinctive style, she plays different variations on the model each time. It is a remarkable piece of sustained invention, auteurist indeed. She performs the Shakespeare that is in her head. It is as though she were reading through the play, with all of the other matters that would be going on in a young 21st Century persona’s mind, a mixture of popular culture references (for her YouTube audience to hook on to), puzzlement, delight, and social critique. Shakespeare’s plays are an archive of attitudes and assumptions a young woman from Los Angeles in 2012 is unlikely to share. The videos artfully square frustration with admiration, rationalising Shakespeare for a new age and a new audience.

The complete Condensed Shakespeare playlist

Links:
YouTube page for Macbeth
Condensed Shakespeare playlist
The Geeky Blonde website